Occasional Images

04 Jun 2012 163 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Just a Field in the Borders ....

Just a Field in the Borders ....

 

.... Or is it.

 

In 1513 the Scots invaded England under King James Iv. On the 9th September the Scottish force appeared on the far ridge above the field whislt the English forces under the Earl of Surrey were on The ridge from where the photograph was taken. located at Flodden near the village of Branxton in the Northumberland fells.

 

The battle was opened by artillery on both sides and when the firing ceased the foot soldiers joined battle. A fierce and devasting fight ensued, according to the English chronicler Edward Hall, "the battle was cruel, none spared other, and the King himself fought valiantly." Hoever by the end of the day the English had triumped with King James and many of the Scots Nobility lay slain on the battlefield.  The numbers vary according to who you read but it is generally accepted that about 12,000 Scots died and about 1,500 English. Edward Hall, thirty years after, wrote in his Chronicle that "12,000 at the least of the best gentlemen and flower of Scotland" were slain, long remembered in the song Flowers of the Forest.

 

 

Just a Field in the Borders ....

 

.... Or is it.

 

In 1513 the Scots invaded England under King James Iv. On the 9th September the Scottish force appeared on the far ridge above the field whislt the English forces under the Earl of Surrey were on The ridge from where the photograph was taken. located at Flodden near the village of Branxton in the Northumberland fells.

 

The battle was opened by artillery on both sides and when the firing ceased the foot soldiers joined battle. A fierce and devasting fight ensued, according to the English chronicler Edward Hall, "the battle was cruel, none spared other, and the King himself fought valiantly." Hoever by the end of the day the English had triumped with King James and many of the Scots Nobility lay slain on the battlefield.  The numbers vary according to who you read but it is generally accepted that about 12,000 Scots died and about 1,500 English. Edward Hall, thirty years after, wrote in his Chronicle that "12,000 at the least of the best gentlemen and flower of Scotland" were slain, long remembered in the song Flowers of the Forest.

 

 

comments (6)

Really like this Les- puts one similar I've got lined up into the shade!
Les Auld: Glad you like it Fred, thanks for the comment.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 4 Jun 2012, 06:53
A lovely picture of the tranquil countryside Les - but what a history it has!
Les Auld: All just hidden below the surface Chris, thanks for the comment.
You've done justice to my favorite subject - fields. Love the narrative too because a Scottish history loving friend was telling be once about the battle of Flodden and I said, "Don't you mean Colloden?" If looks could kill.....
Les Auld: The Scots put a great store in their history Mary, thanks for the comment.
Own up Les,you thought they were train tracks!smileNicely taken all the same. smile
Les Auld: Wishful thinking Frank, thanks for the comment.
I like the lines in the picture Les, and what an interesting history.
Les Auld: Thanks Brian.
I wish I'd seen an arrangement like this.
Les Auld: Thanks Richard.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS 5D Mark II
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/80s
aperture f/8.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 95.0mm
Royal teaRoyal tea
The Ford ZephyrThe Ford Zephyr
Turkish Spiny MouseTurkish Spiny Mo...

Warning