Occasional Images

07 Jun 2011 517 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image Little Moreton Hall

Little Moreton Hall

 

Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire is a building I have long wanted to visit and the opportunity came up last Sunday, so naturally I grabbed at it. This hall has featured on Shutterchance before, Yellowbear (BILL) posted a black and white image some time ago, it looks like we both stood in the same space to take the photograph, just seperated by time..

 

One of Cheshire's famous Black and White Tudor buildings, the hall is actually a shade of ocre with brownish-grey woodwork. The black and white finish was something dreamed up by 19th century romanticism. There are not many horizontal floors or straight walls in the place, it started shifting and sinking almost as soon as it was built by the de Moreton family in the 15th Century. It stayed in the family right up to the start of the 20th century, although it ws more or less a ruin by then. The restoration was started by Miss Elizabeth Moreton, an Anglican nun, and then in 1912 she transferred it to her cousin, Charles Abraham, Bishop of Derby, with the stipulation that it must never be sold. In 1938 it was finally handed over to the National Trust and is now open to the public.

 

The courtyard view.

 

moreton hall

 

Little Moreton Hall

 

Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire is a building I have long wanted to visit and the opportunity came up last Sunday, so naturally I grabbed at it. This hall has featured on Shutterchance before, Yellowbear (BILL) posted a black and white image some time ago, it looks like we both stood in the same space to take the photograph, just seperated by time..

 

One of Cheshire's famous Black and White Tudor buildings, the hall is actually a shade of ocre with brownish-grey woodwork. The black and white finish was something dreamed up by 19th century romanticism. There are not many horizontal floors or straight walls in the place, it started shifting and sinking almost as soon as it was built by the de Moreton family in the 15th Century. It stayed in the family right up to the start of the 20th century, although it ws more or less a ruin by then. The restoration was started by Miss Elizabeth Moreton, an Anglican nun, and then in 1912 she transferred it to her cousin, Charles Abraham, Bishop of Derby, with the stipulation that it must never be sold. In 1938 it was finally handed over to the National Trust and is now open to the public.

 

The courtyard view.

 

moreton hall

 

comments (5)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 7 Jun 2011, 07:26
Just look at it: what an amazing place Les!
Is this the building with a long gallery upstairs?
Les Auld: Yes it is Chris, thanks for the comment.
excellent job, love the lighing
Les Auld: Thank you Ayush, Photmatix and Topaz helped here.
It is a wonderful building Les and you have done it full justice
Les Auld: Isn't it just Bill, thanks for the comment.
Two great shots Les, I've not seen the lower aspect before.
Les Auld: Straight in through the doorway Brian, thanks for the comment.
Fabulous house, I love Tudor buildings smile
Les Auld: This is one of my favourites Linda, thanks for the comment.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS 50D
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/400s
aperture f/8.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 38.0mm
The Nightmare CrewThe Nightmare Cr...
Marim in Brocklebank DockMarim in Brockle...
The Lovell TelescopeThe Lovell Teles...

Warning