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26 Apr 2011 108 views
 
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photoblog image Fire Fly

Fire Fly

 

In Britain the standard gauge for railways in 4ft 8 1/2 inches, as set down from the start of the railway age. However the Great Western Railway, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, pioneered broad gauge from 1838 with a gauge of 7 ft 0 1/4 in, and retained this gauge until 1892. No locomotives or rolling stock exists from this era but a replica of Daniel Gooch's passenger locomotive Fire Fly, conceived by the members of the Firefly Trust assembled at Didcot Railway Centre where it now operates on the replica brioad gauge track.

 

The original Fire Fly is said to have covered the 30.75 miles (49.49 km) from Twyford to London Paddington in 37 minutes, an average speed of 50 miles per hour (80 km/h), which was unprecedented in 1840.

 

Eventualy the problems operating mixed gauges on the national network became unsurmountable and the broad gauge network was replaced by standard gauge track in the late 19th century.

 

 

Fire Fly

 

In Britain the standard gauge for railways in 4ft 8 1/2 inches, as set down from the start of the railway age. However the Great Western Railway, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, pioneered broad gauge from 1838 with a gauge of 7 ft 0 1/4 in, and retained this gauge until 1892. No locomotives or rolling stock exists from this era but a replica of Daniel Gooch's passenger locomotive Fire Fly, conceived by the members of the Firefly Trust assembled at Didcot Railway Centre where it now operates on the replica brioad gauge track.

 

The original Fire Fly is said to have covered the 30.75 miles (49.49 km) from Twyford to London Paddington in 37 minutes, an average speed of 50 miles per hour (80 km/h), which was unprecedented in 1840.

 

Eventualy the problems operating mixed gauges on the national network became unsurmountable and the broad gauge network was replaced by standard gauge track in the late 19th century.

 

 

comments (4)

If only broad gauge had won. Imagine the magnificent rail system we might have now!
Les Auld: It would certainly look different Bill, thanks for the comment.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 26 Apr 2011, 07:59
Amazing Les: I have yet to see this in action but there are sections of old broad gauge rail still in use as fence posts etc all over the ex GWR lines
Les Auld: And probably lots of other uses as well Chris, thanks for the comment.
This is a fine shot once again Les. I really would like to see this in action.
Les Auld: It is rather nice Brian, thanks for the comment.
Beautiful shot Les and very interesting history smile
Les Auld: Thanks Linda, appreciate the comment.

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS 50D
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/250s
aperture f/9.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 30.0mm
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