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10 Jan 2011 391 views
 
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photoblog image The Leverhulme Memorial

The Leverhulme Memorial

 

In 1887 William Hesketh Lever, founder of the soap making concern Lever Brothers, started building a model village for his employees on the Wirral close to his factory that made Sunlight soap. The village was named Port Sunlight and now contains 900 listed buildings in the village alone.

 

The garden village was founded to house his factory workers. Lever personally helped to plan the village, and employed nearly thirty different architects. Between 1899 and 1914, 800 houses with a population of 3,500 were built, together with allotments and public buildings including the Lady Lever Art Gallery, a cottage hospital, schools, a concert hall, open air swimming pool, church, and a temperance hotel. He also introduced schemes for welfare, education and the entertainment of his workers, and encouraged recreation and organisations which promoted art, literature, science or music.

 

Lever's stated aims were "to socialise and Christianise business relations and get back to that close family brotherhood that existed in the good old days of hand labour." He claimed that Port Sunlight was an exercise in profit sharing, but rather than share profits directly, he invested them in the village. He said, "It would not do you much good if you send it down your throats in the form of bottles of whisky, bags of sweets, or fat geese at Christmas. On the other hand, if you leave the money with me, I shall use it to provide for you everything that makes life pleasant – nice houses, comfortable homes, and healthy recreation

 

In 1930 the Lever Memorial, designed by Sir William Reid Dick, was unveiled. at the foot of the memorialis a group of four figures, in the front they represent Industry, Charity and Education whilst Art is standing to thr rear of the group.

 

Art

 

 

The Leverhulme Memorial

 

In 1887 William Hesketh Lever, founder of the soap making concern Lever Brothers, started building a model village for his employees on the Wirral close to his factory that made Sunlight soap. The village was named Port Sunlight and now contains 900 listed buildings in the village alone.

 

The garden village was founded to house his factory workers. Lever personally helped to plan the village, and employed nearly thirty different architects. Between 1899 and 1914, 800 houses with a population of 3,500 were built, together with allotments and public buildings including the Lady Lever Art Gallery, a cottage hospital, schools, a concert hall, open air swimming pool, church, and a temperance hotel. He also introduced schemes for welfare, education and the entertainment of his workers, and encouraged recreation and organisations which promoted art, literature, science or music.

 

Lever's stated aims were "to socialise and Christianise business relations and get back to that close family brotherhood that existed in the good old days of hand labour." He claimed that Port Sunlight was an exercise in profit sharing, but rather than share profits directly, he invested them in the village. He said, "It would not do you much good if you send it down your throats in the form of bottles of whisky, bags of sweets, or fat geese at Christmas. On the other hand, if you leave the money with me, I shall use it to provide for you everything that makes life pleasant – nice houses, comfortable homes, and healthy recreation

 

In 1930 the Lever Memorial, designed by Sir William Reid Dick, was unveiled. at the foot of the memorialis a group of four figures, in the front they represent Industry, Charity and Education whilst Art is standing to thr rear of the group.

 

Art

 

 

comments (8)

  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 10 Jan 2011, 01:00
Well capture Les
Les Auld: Thanks you Vintage, smile
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 10 Jan 2011, 07:27
A most impressive story, Les, and even more impressive memorial. I'm glad we get to see both sides of it. Thank you.
Les Auld: My pleasure Ginnie, thanks for the comment.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 10 Jan 2011, 08:05
Fascinating stuff Les: I must go there one day
Les Auld: Make sure the sun is shining though Chris, thanks for the comment.
On a learning curve with you this morning Les, thanks it is most interesting
Les Auld: A bit of history always goes down well Martin, thanks for the comment.
Okay, I am glad you explained what they stand for, all four of them. Cause it looks like those guys are going to do some ancient ritual out of a very old book to that poor baby.

I know, bad imagination of mine......
Les Auld: A great imagination Marion, and a view of the dark side, thanks for the comment.
A most interesting post Les, I presume the whole place as a good place to visit.
Les Auld: First time I have been there Brian, I'll let you know after I go back.
That is interesting Les..Not long seen a TV program about the Levers and their Sunlight soap..Joanies first job was there..Nice shot BTW.
Les Auld: Thanks Ron, glad you like it.
Port Sunlight is an amazing place and the Lady Lever gallery is magnificent.
Les Auld: It is Bill, this was the first time I had been there. Thanks for the comment.

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camera Canon EOS 50D
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