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19 Nov 2010 529 views
 
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photoblog image Newsham Park Hospital

Newsham Park Hospital

 

On 16 December 1868 a group of ship owners in Liverpool started work on a project to generate interest by the people of Liverpool in the possibility of the establishment of an institution where the orphan children of seamen would be cared for. Ten ship owners each put up £500 pounds towards the founding of the orphanage and a start was made, by the end of 1869 60 children were housed in temporary accomodation.

 

Such were the beginnings of the Seaman's Orphanage in rented premises in Duke Street which accommodated 46 boys and 14 girls, but the enthusiasm of the people of Merseyside was demonstrated on 7 April 1870, when Liverpool Town Council approved a resolution under which a gift of land at the northeast side of Newsham Park should be given to the committee to enable them to build a Seaman's Orphanage, which would in due course open.

 

Liverpool Town Council gave 7,000 square yards of land at the northeast side of Newsham Park to the committee to construct a Seaman's Orphan Institution. On 31 January 1874 the children from the temporary home in Duke Street were transferred, together with 46 newcomers. In addition to the 200 children at the orphanage, the committee also looked after children on an outdoor relief basis.

 

The orphanage lasted until 1949 when, because of many mew rules and regulations and changes in people's views, it closed and the children that remianed transferred to other places.

 

The orphanage was then sold to the new National Health Service in 1951 for use as a hospital and by the milenium it was falling into dis-repair and eventually closed. The site is now up for sale.

 

The Seaman's Institution however continues to provide support to families of seamen who find themselves in difficulties.

 

Alongside the building is a pedestrian tunnel under the railway line in which I used to play as a very young child when I lived in the area.

 

tunnel

 

 

Newsham Park Hospital

 

On 16 December 1868 a group of ship owners in Liverpool started work on a project to generate interest by the people of Liverpool in the possibility of the establishment of an institution where the orphan children of seamen would be cared for. Ten ship owners each put up £500 pounds towards the founding of the orphanage and a start was made, by the end of 1869 60 children were housed in temporary accomodation.

 

Such were the beginnings of the Seaman's Orphanage in rented premises in Duke Street which accommodated 46 boys and 14 girls, but the enthusiasm of the people of Merseyside was demonstrated on 7 April 1870, when Liverpool Town Council approved a resolution under which a gift of land at the northeast side of Newsham Park should be given to the committee to enable them to build a Seaman's Orphanage, which would in due course open.

 

Liverpool Town Council gave 7,000 square yards of land at the northeast side of Newsham Park to the committee to construct a Seaman's Orphan Institution. On 31 January 1874 the children from the temporary home in Duke Street were transferred, together with 46 newcomers. In addition to the 200 children at the orphanage, the committee also looked after children on an outdoor relief basis.

 

The orphanage lasted until 1949 when, because of many mew rules and regulations and changes in people's views, it closed and the children that remianed transferred to other places.

 

The orphanage was then sold to the new National Health Service in 1951 for use as a hospital and by the milenium it was falling into dis-repair and eventually closed. The site is now up for sale.

 

The Seaman's Institution however continues to provide support to families of seamen who find themselves in difficulties.

 

Alongside the building is a pedestrian tunnel under the railway line in which I used to play as a very young child when I lived in the area.

 

tunnel

 

 

comments (6)

Great capture of the detail, and rather sad atmosphere of this building. Thank you for the text, too....really interesting. (:o)
Les Auld: Thanks Rosalyn, it is an interesting place.
I hope this fine building fines a new use and is restored
Les Auld: So do I Bill, thanks for the comment.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 19 Nov 2010, 08:52
It's full of character Les: far too good to fall into disrepair
Les Auld: Cost a fortune to refurbish though Chris, thanks for the comment.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 19 Nov 2010, 09:56
Amazing the you can still be around the same places where you lived and played as a child.

Nice old places.
Les Auld: Not all places still exist though Louis, thanks for the comment.
A fine building Les but what a sad end to all those well meant intentions by previous generations. I like your little play area, typical boys spot.
Les Auld: A wonderland when you are six Brian, thanks for the comment.
Fascinating story (OH learned something new), and a lovely image. Let's hope the place doesn't get demolished.
Les Auld: It is up for sale again Ellie so perhaps. Thanks for the comment.

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camera Canon EOS 50D
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/60s
aperture f/8.0
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 15.0mm
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