Occasional Images

06 Aug 2010 10,140 views
 
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Remembering

 

The main memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum is the Armed Forces Memorial. A 43 metre stone structure sits above a 6 metre high earthen mound reminiscent of the early British Barrows the remains of which may be seen in some parts of the country. The two curved and two straight walls are made from over 200,000 bricks faced with Portland Stone panels, engraved on wgich are the names of srvice men and women who have lost their lives in the service of their country in the years after World War Two. There are over 15,000 names on the wall from over fifty conflicts around the world.

 

The centrepiece of the Memorial is two large bronze sculptures, representing loss and sacrifice, on either side of a central bronze laurel wreath. Created by Ian Rank-Broadley, the sculptures bear silent witness to the cost of armed conflict.

 

The Stonemason

 

The First Sculpture has a nurse and a Gurka soldier carrying the dead whist his name is carved on the wall. The other soldier is pointing towards a gap in the wall through wich the rays of the sun will shine at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month.

 

The First Scultpture

 

The second of the sculptures depicts a wounded man being carried on a stretcher whilst familiy members look on in despair.

 

The Second Sculpture

 

 

Some other images from the Arboretum may be found on my Flickr site here.

 

 

 

 

 

Remembering

 

The main memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum is the Armed Forces Memorial. A 43 metre stone structure sits above a 6 metre high earthen mound reminiscent of the early British Barrows the remains of which may be seen in some parts of the country. The two curved and two straight walls are made from over 200,000 bricks faced with Portland Stone panels, engraved on wgich are the names of srvice men and women who have lost their lives in the service of their country in the years after World War Two. There are over 15,000 names on the wall from over fifty conflicts around the world.

 

The centrepiece of the Memorial is two large bronze sculptures, representing loss and sacrifice, on either side of a central bronze laurel wreath. Created by Ian Rank-Broadley, the sculptures bear silent witness to the cost of armed conflict.

 

The Stonemason

 

The First Sculpture has a nurse and a Gurka soldier carrying the dead whist his name is carved on the wall. The other soldier is pointing towards a gap in the wall through wich the rays of the sun will shine at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month.

 

The First Scultpture

 

The second of the sculptures depicts a wounded man being carried on a stretcher whilst familiy members look on in despair.

 

The Second Sculpture

 

 

Some other images from the Arboretum may be found on my Flickr site here.

 

 

 

 

 

comments (14)

Was due to go there next weekend but llooks like that may not happen now, it looks a very sobering place to visit
Les Auld: It is worth making the visit Derek, thanks for the comment.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 6 Aug 2010, 06:44
Great pictures of the memorial - especially the top one with the couple on the bench.

The died serving their country, however, smacks of some kind of political opportunism. But then, the least they can do is saying 'thank you'.
Les Auld: And it is not often said by the government Louis, it is more so left to charities and individuals to work towards it. Thanks for the comment.
This centrepiece is impressive, in its way beautiful and also very moving. You have caught all three very well Les
Les Auld: Thanks Bill, I must admit I was impressed when I was there, thanks for the comment.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 6 Aug 2010, 07:40
This is extremely powerful stuff Les: thank you for showing it
Les Auld: Thanks Chris, appreciate the comment.
I am lost for words. These images are wonderful, and have inspired me to visit. (:o)
Les Auld: It is a place well worth visiting Rosalyn, there are so many memorials to see. Thanks for the comment.
  • Ginnie
  • Netherlands
  • 6 Aug 2010, 09:59
I hate war, Les, and all its ravages. But I must say that I have seen incredible memorials, like these, that pay just tribute to their fallen heroes. These are exceptional!
Les Auld: There is no doubt about it Ginnie War is evil, unfortunately mankind is such that war is also inevitable at times. Thanks for the comment.
Beautiful capture. A well deserved tribute to those who paid the ultimate price for the rest of us.
Les Auld: Many thanks for the comemnt, appreciate it.
Oh my! What a powerful image!! Very well done!
Les Auld: Thank you Marion, it is a place that can move you indeed.
A fantastic memorial to all. smile
Les Auld: It is Linda, and one that does make you think whilst you are there. Thanks for the comment.
A fine trio Les and the Flickr set are excellent, we shall get there before long I am sure.
Les Auld: Early Autumn should produce some good colours in the trees Brian, thanks for the comment.
  • Richard Trim
  • back in Leicester for a bit
  • 6 Aug 2010, 17:19
the top image is, for me, particularlyponient ... and an excellent capture
Les Auld: Just seemed to convey the way I felt when I was there Richard, thanks for the comment.
Very moving images Les. Well taken
Les Auld: Thanks Janet appreciate the comment.
  • Alan
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 6 Aug 2010, 18:47
Very moving images, Les. I like the inclusion of the figure with the hammer and chisel. Off to look at Flickr now.
Les Auld: Many thanks Alan, appreciate the comment.
Fine selection of images Les
Les Auld: Thanks Pamela, appreciate the comment.

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