Occasional Images

21 Sep 2009 218 views
 
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photoblog image Conversation Point

Conversation Point


A Captain of the Royal Tank Regiment in conversation with a Nurse of the Queen Alexandra Nursing Cops at Bolton Abbey Station.

The Royal Tank regiment is one of the youngest in the British Army, being formed in 1916 with the invention of the Tank. They have fought in most conflicts since then in one way or another. He definitely looks in character with the walking stick, affected by several officers in the corps.

The roots of the Queen Alexandra Nurses are way back in the Crimean War in 1854, serving the nursing needs of the Armed Forces, Civilians caught in conflict and prisoners of war as well.

During the First World War there were about 100,000 nurses in all theatres of war working close to the front lines in many cases. In the Second World War they served again in all theatres of war, were evacuated at Dunkirk and went into Normandy on D-Day with the front line troops and supported them on their fight into Germany.

The QAs were also present at the relief of Bergen-Belsen and Auschwitz Concentration Camps and provided medical support to the people there. In reality you can have nothing but the utmost respect for these nurses as they faced the dangers and horrors of war and tried to put right the wounds and damage they they came across.

Whilst trying to find out more about them I came across their web site and it contains far more detail about them and their history than I can ever cover and, in my opinion, is well worth a visit. It can be found here.

This is the last of my 1940s Weekend images for now but a slide show of further images may be found on my Flickr site here.

Conversation Point


A Captain of the Royal Tank Regiment in conversation with a Nurse of the Queen Alexandra Nursing Cops at Bolton Abbey Station.

The Royal Tank regiment is one of the youngest in the British Army, being formed in 1916 with the invention of the Tank. They have fought in most conflicts since then in one way or another. He definitely looks in character with the walking stick, affected by several officers in the corps.

The roots of the Queen Alexandra Nurses are way back in the Crimean War in 1854, serving the nursing needs of the Armed Forces, Civilians caught in conflict and prisoners of war as well.

During the First World War there were about 100,000 nurses in all theatres of war working close to the front lines in many cases. In the Second World War they served again in all theatres of war, were evacuated at Dunkirk and went into Normandy on D-Day with the front line troops and supported them on their fight into Germany.

The QAs were also present at the relief of Bergen-Belsen and Auschwitz Concentration Camps and provided medical support to the people there. In reality you can have nothing but the utmost respect for these nurses as they faced the dangers and horrors of war and tried to put right the wounds and damage they they came across.

Whilst trying to find out more about them I came across their web site and it contains far more detail about them and their history than I can ever cover and, in my opinion, is well worth a visit. It can be found here.

This is the last of my 1940s Weekend images for now but a slide show of further images may be found on my Flickr site here.

comments (11)

  • Chris
  • England
  • 21 Sep 2009, 00:14
Very interesting images & historical notes too Les - thanks!
Les Auld: Glad you liked it Chris, thanks for the comment.
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 21 Sep 2009, 00:46
"Is your journey really necessary?" I can just imagine him trying to explain it!

And that pistol...I don't think anyone can steal it, Les!
Les Auld: Could get a nasty whack with the stick if anyone tried Ginnie, thanks for the comment.
  • Alan Rolfe
  • Santa Fe, New Mexico
  • 21 Sep 2009, 05:10
No clue that this isn't an image of the period, Les.. very well done.
Les Auld: Thanks Alan, had to wait a while for the scene to unfold though.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 21 Sep 2009, 05:53
At least nurses don't have to wear the hat and cape any longer l would look really silly
Les Auld: You never know Zed, thanks for the comment.
You got some great shots in this series Les
Les Auld: Thanks Bill, I also got an awful lots of rubbish as well.
Interesante imagen y muy bonita! Saludos
Les Auld: las gracias por el comentario, aprecian.
  • vintage
  • Brisbane Australia
  • 21 Sep 2009, 08:59
good capture and well processed
Les Auld: Thanks Vintage, appreciate the comment.
  • blackdog
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 Sep 2009, 09:14
Another good 'un Les - I see they are waiting for the milk train ;o)
Les Auld: So it would appear Mike, thanks for the comment.
I remember well the Poster Les...A great series.
Les Auld: Ah to have such memories, thanks for the comment Ron.
Not only is this a great shot Les but the whole set are as well.
Les Auld: Thanks Brian, and for looking at the others as well.
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 21 Sep 2009, 22:40
Great series Les - I like this one but particularly the Dad's Army one - dead ringers for Pike and Captain Mainwaring. Looks like they were all enjoying themselves.
Ingrid
Les Auld: Thanks Ingrid they were indeed enjoying themselves on the railway, appreciate the comment.

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camera Canon EOS 350D DIGITAL
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aperture f/5.6
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