Occasional Images

14 Sep 2009 216 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image The Palm House...

The Palm House...


... In Sefton Park

Sefton Park Palm House is a Grade II* listed Victorian palm house situated in leafy glades of Sefton Park, 2 miles from Liverpool City Centre. Originally opened in 1896, it measures 25m high on a base of red granite from the Isle of Mull. There are 3,710 flat panes of glass, all individually cut.

In 1939 the glass was painted in camouflage colours to avoid the reflection of moonlight guiding enemy bombers. However, in 1941 a nearby bomb shattered the glass, but left the main structure intact. It was re glazed and  opened again in the 1950’s.

In the1980’s a lack of repairs meant it was closed, left to rot and threatened with demolition.  However local residents took the lead and it was eventually partially re-opened in 1993 and fully opened in with The People of Liverpool paid for most of this restoration by sponsoring each pane of glass for £1.00 each and a Heritage Lottery Grant helped as well.

To ensure the restoration was successful and the building be sustainable the renovators dismantled and numbered the cast iron structure piece by piece. These were blastcleaned and given five coats of protective paint. Only the main eight support beams remained in situ. After returning the iron sections, the glass was then replaced and the Palm House repopulated with a wide range of plants and trees. Eight external marble and bronze statues by French sculptor Chavalliaud represent world explorers and botanists are arranged, one at each of the eigth corners of the building.

A further selection of images can be found here on my Flickr site.

The Palm House...


... In Sefton Park

Sefton Park Palm House is a Grade II* listed Victorian palm house situated in leafy glades of Sefton Park, 2 miles from Liverpool City Centre. Originally opened in 1896, it measures 25m high on a base of red granite from the Isle of Mull. There are 3,710 flat panes of glass, all individually cut.

In 1939 the glass was painted in camouflage colours to avoid the reflection of moonlight guiding enemy bombers. However, in 1941 a nearby bomb shattered the glass, but left the main structure intact. It was re glazed and  opened again in the 1950’s.

In the1980’s a lack of repairs meant it was closed, left to rot and threatened with demolition.  However local residents took the lead and it was eventually partially re-opened in 1993 and fully opened in with The People of Liverpool paid for most of this restoration by sponsoring each pane of glass for £1.00 each and a Heritage Lottery Grant helped as well.

To ensure the restoration was successful and the building be sustainable the renovators dismantled and numbered the cast iron structure piece by piece. These were blastcleaned and given five coats of protective paint. Only the main eight support beams remained in situ. After returning the iron sections, the glass was then replaced and the Palm House repopulated with a wide range of plants and trees. Eight external marble and bronze statues by French sculptor Chavalliaud represent world explorers and botanists are arranged, one at each of the eigth corners of the building.

A further selection of images can be found here on my Flickr site.

comments (15)

  • graham pickett
  • SOUTHSEA ENGLAND
  • 14 Sep 2009, 00:21
Great capture Les,your other shots on Flickr are first class.Really pleased this has been saved and restored,such a beautiful building to treasure,just think what it would cost to build these days?
Les Auld: I couldn't even begin to know just how much Graham, thanks for the comment.
Real magnificent structure, had a chance to view ur flickr version which shows it in all it's glory. Lovely series of images.
Les Auld: Thanks fotografa, appreciate the comment and that you tokk some time to look at my Flickr gallery as well.
  • Ginnie
  • Atlanta, GA, United States
  • 14 Sep 2009, 01:42
It's like a crown jewel, Les! I love your perspective and PPing!
Les Auld: Might be a bit heavy wearing it though Ginnie, thanks for the comment.
  • vintage
  • Australia
  • 14 Sep 2009, 01:42
Les this is a great photo of a wonderful building.I think this has to bee on my place to visit list
Les Auld: And you would be made welcome Vintage, thanks for the comment.
  • zed
  • Australia
  • 14 Sep 2009, 04:43
Well worth the trouble to preserve Les
Les Auld: It is Tony, thanks for the comment.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 14 Sep 2009, 05:56
A charming image Les. I'm so pleased this structure has survived
Les Auld: Thanks Chris, appreciate the comment.
  • Alan Rolfe
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 14 Sep 2009, 08:01
Good news, Les. It sounds now like the building has a strong chance of survival. A fine tribute to the work of those early visionaries who built it in the first place.
Les Auld: It was a cast iron world back than Alan, with visionaries who ent further and further in it's use. Thanks for the comment.
Just had a look at the pictures on your Flickr site Les. Great pictures and what a wonderful building. Great that it has been saved
Les Auld: It is indeed Bill, thanks for the comment.
A great collection of photo Les, here and on Flickr. A lovely building, and well done to the people who raised the money for its preservation.
Les Auld: Thanks Sheila, appreciate the comment and your taking the time to look at my Flickr site.
  • anniedog
  • United Kingdom
  • 14 Sep 2009, 10:13
Just shows how strongly people feel about their heritage and what they can do when they band together. Great POV. Had a look at your Flickr site - an amazing building.
Ingrid
Les Auld: Sometimes people power does work Ingrid, thanks for the comment.
A good picture of this wonderful building Les..Nice to see people care.
Les Auld: It is indeed Ron, thanks for the comment.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 14 Sep 2009, 14:05
Excellent work by the community and restorers. These old plant houses should never be lost.
Les Auld: Couldn't agree more Louis, they should be saved for generations to come. Thanks for the comment.
A fine looking building inside and out les. this works so well in monochrome.
Les Auld: It does indeed Brian, thanks for the comment.
typical part of our history was going to be left to rot till jo blogs and co stepped in, remarkable structure and great shot Lessmile
Les Auld: And it looks great from the inside as well, thanks for the comment.
even more remarkable having watched your flickr slide show Lessmile
Les Auld: Glad you liked it Chris.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS 350D DIGITAL
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/320s
aperture f/11.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 28.0mm
The Nightmare CrewThe Nightmare Cr...
The Rebel AttackThe Rebel Attack
The Rainbow in the FountainThe Rainbow in t...

Warning