Occasional Images

19 Jul 2009 895 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image The Florrie in the Dingle

The Florrie in the Dingle


Or as it is more formally know The Florence Institute for Boys.

The Florrie is a fine building, with a long history of serving the people of Dingle and South Liverpool. It occupies a unique place in our social history, as it is arguably the first building ever to be specifically constructed as a (boy's) youth club in Great Britain.

In 1889, Sir Bernard Hall, a wealthy merchant and former Lord Mayor of Liverpool, built the (now Grade 2-listed) Institute in honour of his daughter, who died in Paris at the untimely age of 22. It was built with the aim to "provide a place of instruction and recreation for the poor and working boys of this parish". Throughout the 20th Century, The Florrie played an important and positive part in the lives of several generations of the local community, providing a range of leisure, recreation and educational services.

The building became disused in the 1980's, and consequently fell into disrepair in the 1990's. Subsequent regeneration efforts became the victims of circumstance and mismanagement, with funders pulling out of the project, damaging community in-fighting, and a major fire in 1999 which destroyed the roof.

The outlook may however be looking better as local residents, the council and the Liverpool Echo have been campaigning for its restoration. Only time will tell.

Whilst photographing the building two elderly ladies told me about their experiences witht he Florrie during the Second World War. They lived opposite the building and whenthe air-raid sirens sounded they and their families would seek refuge in the basement of the Florrie awaitng the sounding of the all-clear.


The Florrie in the Dingle


Or as it is more formally know The Florence Institute for Boys.

The Florrie is a fine building, with a long history of serving the people of Dingle and South Liverpool. It occupies a unique place in our social history, as it is arguably the first building ever to be specifically constructed as a (boy's) youth club in Great Britain.

In 1889, Sir Bernard Hall, a wealthy merchant and former Lord Mayor of Liverpool, built the (now Grade 2-listed) Institute in honour of his daughter, who died in Paris at the untimely age of 22. It was built with the aim to "provide a place of instruction and recreation for the poor and working boys of this parish". Throughout the 20th Century, The Florrie played an important and positive part in the lives of several generations of the local community, providing a range of leisure, recreation and educational services.

The building became disused in the 1980's, and consequently fell into disrepair in the 1990's. Subsequent regeneration efforts became the victims of circumstance and mismanagement, with funders pulling out of the project, damaging community in-fighting, and a major fire in 1999 which destroyed the roof.

The outlook may however be looking better as local residents, the council and the Liverpool Echo have been campaigning for its restoration. Only time will tell.

Whilst photographing the building two elderly ladies told me about their experiences witht he Florrie during the Second World War. They lived opposite the building and whenthe air-raid sirens sounded they and their families would seek refuge in the basement of the Florrie awaitng the sounding of the all-clear.


comments (7)

  • zed
  • Australia
  • 19 Jul 2009, 00:37
Sad to see such a fine building with such history behind it, fall into such a state of disrepair
Les Auld: It is indeed Zed, thanks for the comment.
  • Ellie
  • England
  • 19 Jul 2009, 00:43
Let's hope the corporations sees sense and leaves some old buildings for posterity. This one's beautiful, and a fine example of good Victorian brickwork
Les Auld: Couldn't agree more Ellie, thanks for the comment.
  • JulianG
  • Argentina
  • 19 Jul 2009, 04:25
beautyful bilding Les and with a long history... very good shot!smile
Les Auld: Thanks Julian, appreciate the comment.
So many great buildings are lost, let's hope this won't be another one Les
Les Auld: We can only hope Bill, thanks for the comment.
  • Chris
  • England
  • 19 Jul 2009, 08:13
What a fine building Les - and what a shame too see it in such a state of disrepair
Les Auld: It is Chris, I can only hope it is rebuilt and used as it should be. Thanks for the comment.
  • Astrid
  • Netherlands
  • 19 Jul 2009, 16:47
do they rent appartments...
Great eye and I do hope they take care of that building soon.
Les Auld: All open to the fresh air Astrid, lets the rain in as well. thanks for the comment.
That is a STUNNING building. I do hope some effort is put into preserving it.
Les Auld: It would be even more stunning if renovated David, thanks for the comment.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon 350D
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed unknown
aperture f/0.0
sensitivity unknown
focal length 0.0mm
Royal teaRoyal tea
Florence Institute for BoysFlorence Institu...
The fading picture palacesThe fading pictu...

Warning