Occasional Images

15 Dec 2007 317 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image The Oratory

The Oratory

 

In the 17th Century Liverpool was growing fast and there was much new building work going on, a bit like today I suppose. To meet the need for stone there were several local quarries surrounding the town. One of them was next to a natural hill known locally as Mount Zion, later renamed St James Mount. Sandstone was quarried from there over the next few hundred years, going to great building projects such as the docks and the town hall. In 1771 the mayor order a public space to be created by the quarry so paths and slopes down were created. By the year 1825 the useful stone from the quarry had been exhausted and the corporation raised nearly £20,000 by public subscription and employed the young architect John Foster (1786 - 1846) to design and lay out a cemetery along the same lines of the Pere-la-Chaise, Paris. And so St james cemetery was created in the quarry.

On the high ground to the North-West, on the site of an old windmill, he built the Oratory in 1827 in the style of ancient Greece as a result of his travels to that region. The cemetery was opened in 1829 and the last burial was in 1936, after some 57,774 souls had been interred in the graves and catacombs there. During the 1960s the cemetery was somewhat restored from its derilict state, the graves clearerd to make a new public space. The Oratory was restored and now sits on its small acropolis dwarfed by the Anglican Cathedral built next to it on St James Mount.  

The Oratory

 

In the 17th Century Liverpool was growing fast and there was much new building work going on, a bit like today I suppose. To meet the need for stone there were several local quarries surrounding the town. One of them was next to a natural hill known locally as Mount Zion, later renamed St James Mount. Sandstone was quarried from there over the next few hundred years, going to great building projects such as the docks and the town hall. In 1771 the mayor order a public space to be created by the quarry so paths and slopes down were created. By the year 1825 the useful stone from the quarry had been exhausted and the corporation raised nearly £20,000 by public subscription and employed the young architect John Foster (1786 - 1846) to design and lay out a cemetery along the same lines of the Pere-la-Chaise, Paris. And so St james cemetery was created in the quarry.

On the high ground to the North-West, on the site of an old windmill, he built the Oratory in 1827 in the style of ancient Greece as a result of his travels to that region. The cemetery was opened in 1829 and the last burial was in 1936, after some 57,774 souls had been interred in the graves and catacombs there. During the 1960s the cemetery was somewhat restored from its derilict state, the graves clearerd to make a new public space. The Oratory was restored and now sits on its small acropolis dwarfed by the Anglican Cathedral built next to it on St James Mount.  

comments (6)

Lovely crisp image and nicely monotoned Les- thanks for the excellent history too- we often forget just how much fascinating history is around the middle of our big cities.
Les Auld: And there is a lot of history about, thanks David.
super photo Les, great processing well donesmile
Les Auld: Thanks Tim, appreciate the comment.
Fantastic detail in this photograph, and the sky is wonderful. Very interesting text really adds to the enjoyment. (:o)
Les Auld: Thanks Rosalyn, must admit to liking a bit of history.
Thanks for the interesting slice of history to accompany this super shot Les
Les Auld: Thanks Bill, I thought it needed a few words.
Isn't it weird to see a full-blown Greek temple with a municipal railing around it. Very British! Great picture and very interesting notes. Thanks Les.
Les Auld: Thanks Ian, it's not much used know unfortunately.
Hi Les!

That's a wonderful photo...I worked as an Architect for 6 years on the end of Rodney Street, a few hundred yards from this spot!

I arrived here from Maxblack's photoblog and seeing that you are from Southport I had to stop and say hello!....I'm so used to only seeing photobloggers from other countries that it was a lovely surprise to see a familiar town name appear.

I was born and grew up in Crosby (now living in Cheshire and working in Manchester with another office in Southport)

Anyway, enough rambling... lovely photos you have here - keep up the great work!

Regards,

Ian
Les Auld: Hi Ian thnaks for stopping by, appreciate your taking time to comment. I'm always pleased to see works from other photographers in the North West, I have looked through your web site and there are some grand photos there.

I know Rodney Street quite well, often walked down there, some great front doors on the street, one day I'll go back and take some pictures along there.

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a positive comments icon ShMood©
camera Canon EOS 350D DIGITAL
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/80s
aperture f/5.6
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 41.0mm
Royal teaRoyal tea
The Huskisson MemorialThe Huskisson Me...
Sunrise over the GormleysSunrise over the...

Warning