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28 Nov 2007 370 views
 
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photoblog image The End of the Line

The End of the Line

The Liverpool Overhead Railway was the world's first elevated electric railway and ran from Seaforth in tne north to the Dingle in the south. It was also known as the Docker's Umbrella as it ran alongside the docks providing fabulous views of the ships and industry of that ares. Built in 1889 and extended to the Dingle in 1896. It provided a valuable service until it was dismantled in 1956 as it was not economical to provide the repairs necessary to keep it running.

The portal above Heculaneum Dock is the only surviving sign that the railway exisited. This is where the railway entered the rock upon which the Dingle was built to reach the only underground station on an overhead railway.

The End of the Line

The Liverpool Overhead Railway was the world's first elevated electric railway and ran from Seaforth in tne north to the Dingle in the south. It was also known as the Docker's Umbrella as it ran alongside the docks providing fabulous views of the ships and industry of that ares. Built in 1889 and extended to the Dingle in 1896. It provided a valuable service until it was dismantled in 1956 as it was not economical to provide the repairs necessary to keep it running.

The portal above Heculaneum Dock is the only surviving sign that the railway exisited. This is where the railway entered the rock upon which the Dingle was built to reach the only underground station on an overhead railway.

comments (8)

  • mick
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 28 Nov 2007, 08:52
good history shot les,same its still not running.
Les Auld: I can only agree Mick, thanks for the comment.
  • Louis
  • South Africa
  • 28 Nov 2007, 10:19
Great shot. What draws my attention is the amount of carving that was done to try and beautify what may have been a common bridge otherwise.
Les Auld: A tribute to the Victorian Builders Louis, thanks for stopping by.
  • Martin
  • United States
  • 28 Nov 2007, 16:00
Interesting history and a fitting shot to illustrate it.
Les Auld: Thanks Martin, appreciate the comment.
A familiar friend as a child. My grandmother lived opposite Princes Dock gate and we used the Overhead as an umbrella on many an occasion walking from the Pier Head home. It's demise was due to a fundamental design fault the track ran on a base on inverted semi-circular sections of steel. The horizontal joints between these sections were drained but unfortunately the drains were too small and easily blocked and not easy to clean. The accumulated water resulting in accelerated corrosion problems. But was a great ride during the hey day of the Liverpool docks, A school boys delight!

This excellent shot is worthy memento.
Les Auld: I have vague memories of overhead as a young boy, it was a treat to travel on it and see the docks in action. A great landmark ruind by a small feature, thnaks for the comment, and the additional bit of history.
  • Bill Phillips
  • Droitwich on a horrible November day
  • 28 Nov 2007, 17:15
Nice shot and an interesting bit of history Les.
Les Auld: Thanks Bill, glad you like it.
Interesting shot and blog, but I can't work out what i8s going on inside the arch. It doesn't seem to be the entrance to a tunnel or to lead anywhere.
Les Auld: It was blocked up when they took the tracks down. Thanks for the comment.
Nicely done and interresting !
Les Auld: Thanks Zeb, appreciate the comment.
Here you have made a very interesting work with turned and the textures!
Les Auld: Glad you like it Jose.

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camera Canon 350D
exposure mode full manual
shutterspeed unknown
aperture f/0.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 70.0mm
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