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10 Nov 2007 590 views
 
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photoblog image To Remember the Mexico..

To Remember the Mexico..

... On the Night of the Green Sea

December 9th 1886 is one of the most tragic dates in the history of the lifeboat movement. The German cargo boat Mexico had run aground off the Lancashire coast, just north of Southport, in a storm and was fast breaking up when lifeboats at Southport, St. Annes and Lytham were launched. Spectator's worst fears, raised by lack of the usual light signals from the lifeboats, were confirrmed when the bodies of Southport lifeboatmen began to be washed up on the beach. Morning light revealed the Southport boat, Eliza Fernley, keel up on a sandbank. The implications of the tragedy were only fully realised when Laura Janet, the St. Annes lifeboat, was also spotted upturned. The 12 crewmen from the Mexico were finally rescued by the Lytham boat, the Charles Briggs, but 27 of the 44 lifeboatmen who had set out never returned, leaving behind 16 widows and 50 orphans. 

On the back of a wave of national sympathy a relief fund was set up and the first public street collections for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution were held, organised by Charles Macara  A tradition which has continued to this day.

This monument is a tribute to these men and may be found on the St. Annes promenade, gazing out to the site of the disaster.

Then, as now, all lifeboatmen were volunteers, risking their lives to save others in peril on the sea.  I have a vague memory of my grandfather in Scotland helping with the lifeboat in Newburgh, Aberdeenshire, but do not really know the facts, one day I will try to find out.

A further account of the tragedy may be found here and details of the RNLI are here

To Remember the Mexico..

... On the Night of the Green Sea

December 9th 1886 is one of the most tragic dates in the history of the lifeboat movement. The German cargo boat Mexico had run aground off the Lancashire coast, just north of Southport, in a storm and was fast breaking up when lifeboats at Southport, St. Annes and Lytham were launched. Spectator's worst fears, raised by lack of the usual light signals from the lifeboats, were confirrmed when the bodies of Southport lifeboatmen began to be washed up on the beach. Morning light revealed the Southport boat, Eliza Fernley, keel up on a sandbank. The implications of the tragedy were only fully realised when Laura Janet, the St. Annes lifeboat, was also spotted upturned. The 12 crewmen from the Mexico were finally rescued by the Lytham boat, the Charles Briggs, but 27 of the 44 lifeboatmen who had set out never returned, leaving behind 16 widows and 50 orphans. 

On the back of a wave of national sympathy a relief fund was set up and the first public street collections for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution were held, organised by Charles Macara  A tradition which has continued to this day.

This monument is a tribute to these men and may be found on the St. Annes promenade, gazing out to the site of the disaster.

Then, as now, all lifeboatmen were volunteers, risking their lives to save others in peril on the sea.  I have a vague memory of my grandfather in Scotland helping with the lifeboat in Newburgh, Aberdeenshire, but do not really know the facts, one day I will try to find out.

A further account of the tragedy may be found here and details of the RNLI are here

comments (8)

Oh yes, as a salty seafaring man (well, in my dreams!) I really appreciate this one.
Les Auld: Thanks Ian, appreciate the comment, and hope the dreams continue.
  • lasiate
  • Philippines
  • 10 Nov 2007, 14:19
beau travail de traitement ! les nuages ne lui font pas peur!
Les Auld: Many thanks for taking the time to stop by and comment on the picture.
Great photo Les and an interesting read too - I was only thinking about the RNLI yesterday for some reason.

Toning works really well - just the right sky for a backdrop too. Good work and great "blogging"
Les Auld: Thanks Mike, this is one picture I have wanted to do for a long time but only now have managed to take a half decent image.
Great tonal treatment les!!
A charity well deserving of our support, Les. What a terrible tradgedy and a worthy monument. Beautifully captured against that sky. (:o)
This is simply superb Les.
  • Pilgrim
  • United Kingdom
  • 10 Nov 2007, 20:10
Striking emotive image and tale Les. The RNLI do a superb job and deserve everyones support. Well done. David.
A shining composition, where the clouds and the turned one obtain create a majestic effect to the statue! Good work, Them!
Les Auld: Thanks Jose, I think this is one of the best sculptures to be found locally.

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camera Canon EOS 350D DIGITAL
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/250s
aperture f/9.0
sensitivity ISO100
focal length 53.0mm
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